Love Begins at 40!

I’m delighted to say that my latest novel, Love Begins at 40, is on pre-order for kindle at 99p/99c.LoveBeginsAt40byAnnBurnett100

It’s set in a small seaside town on the west coast of Scotland, Largs, which I know well, and where I spoke last year at the local writers’ club. So they can take a share of providing me with the inspiration for it as I had a delightful day there.

It’s about Maisie, a successful business woman in Glasgow, who, as she approaches her fortieth birthday, has doubts about where her future lies. She has some rather difficult decisions to make that impact not only her, but other people in her life. Can she make the right choice? And what is the right thing to do?

But then tragedy strikes a double blow, and she’s forced to make those important decisions about what she really wants from life.
I hope you enjoy it. Please let me know what you think.

Back to Work!

Now that we are settled in our temporary home – an old town house set over three floors with one room on each and doing wonders for our calf muscles as we trundle up and down – I have no excuse for not getting on with writing tasks.

The edits for my next novel for Tirgearr Publishing, Love Begins at 40, have arrived so I’m working my way through them. I have a great editor, Christine, who picks up on all sorts of details that I miss, like commas and other punctuation marks. I assume that in the heat of creation, I tend to miss them out but in reality, I’m not entirely sure when and what to use. And anyway, each publishing house has its own style so what is acceptable for one is a no-no in another.

Love Begins at 40 will be out in August, about the time when we finally move into our new home so a double celebration will be in order.

And in another success, I’ve just heard that an article I wrote on the Palaces in Kirkwall, Orkney has been accepted for an American magazine, the Highlander. I’ve sent loads of photos for it as well so I’m looking forward to seeing it in print.

Summer appears to be here at last, at least for a few days, and it’s brought everyone out into the sunshine. Long may it continue!

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Down by the River

 

Thank Goodness for Books!

There is nothing like moving house for raising stress levels to dangerous heights. It’s not the clearing out and packing that does it, no, it’s dealing with those organisations which appear to have been set up to provide the highest level of annoyance in the shortest possible time. Take phoning them up for instance; a long number followed by a long spiel about this and that, followed by a variety of numbers to press to get you through to another series of numbers till eventually, eventually you hear a human voice. Only to have it tell you that it’s going to cost you a lot of money to transfer/cancel/change whatever it is you’ve got with them.

Thank heavens for books and Jane Austen in particular! When I feel stressed I turn to her and this time it’s Mansfield Park. It’s quite a long time since I read it and I’ve discovered I’d forgotten quite a bit of the story. I remembered the part about the theatricals and the displeasure of Mr Bertram but I didn’t remember what came after. Fanny Price is such an insipid little thing that she wouldn’t stand a chance nowadays but then she was admired for her high principles and quiet ways. She’s in no way like the sparkling Elizabeth Bennet or the interfering, high-handed Emma Woodhouse; more like Jane Bennet perhaps, but even less confident of her charms.

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Another book I reread recently was Jo Baker’s take on Pride and Prejudice from the servants’ point of view, Longbourn. Hill is given an interesting backstory which sheds a different light on the Bennets and on the master of the house in particular.

It’s glorious to escape into a book and put the day’s problems to one side. I’ve also read Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman, a wonderful book with a feel-good message for all of us introverts who have ever felt apart from the mainstream of life, who have felt awkward amongst people, who have never fitted in – for everyone in fact.

All these books could be classed as romantic fiction; the heroines get their fella at the end, or are well on the road to doing so but you’d never find them alongside the Miils and Boon titles on the site of that great river of books purveyor.

So what makes them different? The quality of the writing for starters, the development of the characters, the depth and realism of the emotions portrayed – all add up to a rich and satisfying read and one which guarantees an escape from the trials of everyday life.

And I can’t miss out on a plug for my take on the genre – Festival Fireworks, published as an ebook on April 18th at its full price of $3.99 but available on a special pre-order cost of $1.39/99p.

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Has It Really Been a Year?

March is Scottish Association of Writers conference time  which I blogged about this time last year. And here I was again, arriving with my suitcase, greeting friends I hadn’t seen since then and eagerly scanning the programme to see what was on offer.

Last year I was an adjudicator with lots of things to do and a workshop to run, but this year I could relax and take things easy and enjoy attending all sorts of talks and workshops (and pick up some tips from other adjudicators!)

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Our Club Winners

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Party Time

Friday evening always starts for our members with a gathering in the biggest bedroom for a wee drink and catch up before dinner. Then the exciting bit – the results of the competitions, or at least some of them. It continues on Saturday morning when the clubs’ tallies of trophies is assessed. This year, the Perth club took the honours, while in the Poetry competition, the Angus club swept the board.

What with workshops, book sales, informal get-togethers and loads and loads of food, it’s a hectic and filled (and filling!) weekend.

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More Avid Listeners

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Avid Listeners

My best moment came when in the middle of a seminar, I heard my phone and quickly checked it to find that my second novel had just been accepted by Tirgearr Publishing.  Unable to shriek with joy, jump up and down or generally celebrate as I wanted to, I sat there with a silly grin on my face until I could leave and go skipping along the corridor to tell my writerly mates.

There’s a grand gala dinner when the trophies are presented and this year’s guest speaker was Simon Brett who entertained us royally with spoofs of Nordic Noir, Agatha Christie and sundry other characters from his rich repertoire.

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…and the speaker, Simon Brett

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The Gala Dinner…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunday saw a new President and Vice-president voted in – Wendy Jones took over from Marc Sherland as president, and Gillian Duff became Vice-president in place of Jen Butler. They both have a hard act to follow but I’m sure they’ll be very successful.

As we say in this part of the world, ma heid’s nippin, filled with information, ideas, tips and contacts which I need to digest and act on.

But meantime, there’s a house move to organise and next year, I’ll be arriving at the conference from the other side of the country. Can’t wait!

 

 

 

Festival Fireworks

My latest book, Festival Fireworks, published by Tirgearr, is now available to pre-order for Kindle at a special price of only $1.39c/99p. I hope you enjoy reading it!

FestivalFireworksbyAnnBurnett200Twenty-seven year old Aussie, Jill Kennedy, has arrived in Edinburgh during the festival and is staying in her aunt’s empty flat. Immediately, she crosses swords with her new neighbour, Andrew MacCallum-Blair. To make things worse, she discovers he’s her boss in the temporary job she’s taken so she can afford to see Scotland.

For his part, Andrew has decided to harden his heart against falling in love again but Jill’s fresh and frank approach to life threaten to break down the barricades he’s erected around his heart.

Jill can’t understand Andrew’s changing moods, and even more, her own confused feelings for ‘Mr Bossy’, as she has nicknamed him.

As fireworks burst over Edinburgh Castle, Jill and Andrew must decide whether the fireworks sparking between them will lead to love or a parting of the ways.

And here’s the link to my Tirgearr author page.

 

 

Susan Ferrier, the Scottish Jane Austen

I am thoroughly enjoying reading Marriage by Susan Ferrier. I had never heard of this author, yet she was a very successful writer in the nineteenth century and her books were much admired by Sir Walter Scott. In fact, she earned far more from her writing than Jane Austen herself. But her name has disappeared from readers’ minds.

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Thanks to the Scottish writer, Val McDermid, that, hopefully, will change soon. She is publicising Ferrier’s work by having it illuminated across buildings in Edinburgh, Susan’s home town. Follow the link to read all about it.

Marriage is set in Edinburgh, the Highlands and London and follows two generations of women, mother and daughter, with very different views of life and love. Lady Juliana elopes with her lover, whom she marries and almost instantly regrets it when she meets up with his family in the Highlands. One of her daughters, Mary, is brought up by her aunt there while Lady Juliana returns to London and life, as she sees it. Mary eventually joins her there but is not enamoured of her mother and her behaviour.

Throughout, Ferrier’s wit and humour enliven the story and her telling little details of Scottish life in the capital and in the north, as well as her knowledge of London society, combine to produce a story to rival that of Austen at her best.

I can’t tell you the ending as I’m not there yet, but I wouldn’t spoil it for any of you potential readers even if I did.

Janus – looking both ways

The Roman God Janus is always depicted as looking both ways – back to the past and forwards into the future.

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So, looking back: 2017 was quite a year. I self-published two books, A Drop of Rainbow Magic for children and an illustrated memoir,A Scottish Childhood; Growing Up a Baby Boomer.

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On top of all that, I spoke and adjudicated competitions at a couple of events, ran several workshops on various aspects of writing, attended conferences and lunches organised by the Scottish Association of Writers and the Society of Authors in Scotland, did readings and sold books at book fairs, as well as writing a children’s book (rejected but still trying!) and revising a novel which was accepted by a publisher.

And in 2018? I’ve finished the first round of editing for the novel, Festival Fireworks, so it’s on to having the cover designed ready for its launch in the spring. I’m 22,000 words into another novel, thanks to the push of NaNoWriMo, and I want to get a move on with that this month.

Who knows what else I’ll get up to? It’s exciting looking forward but also there’s a bit of trepidation too. Anything can happen.

Janus was also the god of beginnings and endings, of gates and portals; in times of peace his gates were closed and only opened in times of war.

Let us hope that in 2018 his gates remain firmly closed to war and that he heralds new beginnings for us all.

A Happy New Year to all my friends and followers!

 

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Society of Authors Christmas Lunch

It was off to Edinburgh on a clear, very cold morning for the Society of Authors Christmas lunch. As the train travelled up the coast towards Glasgow, I could see the Isle of Arran glittering in its light dusting of snow. The quiet, peaceful scene was soon shattered when we reached Glasgow and its hordes of shoppers already out looking for Christmas bargains.view arran

The train to Edinburgh was packed. Were they all going there to shop? What was wrong with the Glasgow shops? Or were the trains going the opposite way also packed with people coming to Glasgow to shop? I sat beside a lovely young Polish family, the two girls practising their knowledge of the language while writing and drawing. They were very talented young artists so I couldn’t resist handing over a couple of my bookmarks and suggesting they buy A Drop of Rainbow Magic where they could be the illustrators of the stories. Never miss an opportunity – that’s my motto!

Edinburgh is a city of stairs and steps and we climbed the Scotsman Steps, all 105 of them to reach our venue in the Royal Mile, the Radisson Blu hotel, reputed to be haunted!royal mile

Lunch was a constant babble of voices as we chatted and caught up with friends, but not a ghost was to be seen, fortunately.hotel

Two of my fellow Tirgearr authors were there and they filled me in on what to expect as I went through the processing of editing, launching and publicising my book. (Festival Fireworks in case you’re asking, out in March 2018. And set in Edinburgh too.)lunch 2

Self-publishing, virtual book launches and book and craft fairs were other topics I learned a lot about from speaking to other authors and I came away with plenty to mull over and swot up. lunch 1

And Scotrail decided that after all that lovely food and drink, we would need some exercise to walk it off. So after climbing down the Scotsman Steps again to Waverley Station, we crossed and recrossed the station trying to find a train going to Glasgow that wasn’t cancelled. Third time lucky, we squeezed into a carriage and set off home.

Why is it that the trains to and from Ayr to Glasgow are long, comfortable with plenty of seats and lovely views while the trains between the two main cities in Scotland are much smaller, cramped, packed out and liable to be cancelled there and then? Or is that a question for another time, another blog?

But we all had a lovely day and many thanks to the President Linda Strachan and her committee for organising it all. Here’s to the next one!